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Coil Cleaning

Air Restore has a comprehensive understanding of the issues involved with contaminated coils.

Air Restore has a comprehensive understanding of the issues involved with contaminated coils. How they impact on occupant\ health and system performance, including energy consumption. If coils are managed to protect the health of building occupants then as a result we can expect better performing systems and a reduction in energy use.

Lets get coiling coils into perspective:

  • An average air conditioning cooling coil, 150mm deep, operating 10 hours per day would see approximately 100,000 metres of air go over any point on that coil’s fin surface in one day.
  • Comparing the area of the coil to the floor area served by the coil and if the floor was cleaned once a week and the coil once a year then there would be 50 times more attention paid to the floor than to the coil.
  • Most floors are dry 99.9% of the time, but most cooling coils are wet 90% of the time. Both floors and coils are subject to lots of particulate matter, but coiling coils provide the greatest opportunity for microbial growth and dissemination of microorganisms and there by-products throughout the occupied spaces because all air entering a building through the desired pathway passes over the coil.
  • Coils contaminated with organic dusts in combination with moisture production are subject to the growth of biofilm. Biofilm is often made up of gram negative bacteria which produces endotoxin as a by-product of the organisms metabolism. Also when dead, dying or stressed gram negative organisms can still release endotoxin. Endotoxin exposure has been increasingly linked to respiratory illnesses in building occupants.
  • Fungal contamination of coils is also a common problem. Fungal spores can be released into the airflow from coils and contaminate the building air. Fungi can also produce byproducts such as mycotoxins and glucans which have been linked to a variety of symptoms experienced in sick buildings.

When to clean

  • Good cleaning procedures have to start when coils are put into operation, not two to three years down the road! Modern coil design means that with coils that are over 4 rows deep and have suffered neglect, it is almost impossible to properly clean the middle rows of the coil. The coil may look clean on the surface but it is not necessarily the case.
  • When coils have suffered neglect from either poor filtration, air by-pass of filters or irregular cleaning maintenance the cleaning process needs to consider this to be effective.
  • Filtration efficiency, hours of operation, use of building and location due to outside air contaminants all need to be considered when determining how often individual installations will require cleaning. Regular inspection is recommended to determine the time frame for cleaning and sanitising of coils.

Advantages

  • A dirty coil has a greater pressure drop and hence more fan energy is required to drive the airflow. A clean coil will save energy
  • Clean coils and condensate drain trays reduce the threat of Indoor Air Quality issues arising from this source.

Air Restore has a comprehensive understanding of the issues involved with contaminated coils. How they impact on occupant health and system performance, including energy consumption. If coils are managed to protect the health of building occupants then as a result we can expect better performing systems and a reduction in energy use. Air Restore is a licensed applicator of
Aeris-Guard: specialised antimicrobial systems for HVAC systems and components. For a brochure on the AERIS-GUARD range of
products or to discuss our coil cleaning services contact Air Restore.

 

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